The Biology of Doom

The Biology of Doom

The History of America's Secret Germ Warfare Project

Book - 1999
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Baker & Taylor
Offers an expose of America's secret biological warfare program, from its origins during World War II to its end in 1969

McMillan Palgrave
The first book to expose the true story of America's secret program to create biological weapons of mass destruction.

From anthrax to botulism, from smallpox to Ebola, the threat of biological destruction is rapidly overtaking our collective fear of atomic weaponry. In an era when a lone fanatic could wipe out an entire population with the contents of a small vial, the specter of germ warfare has moved into a prominent position in the public's mind. This riveting narrative traces America's own covert biological weapons program from its origins in World War II to its abrupt cancellation in 1969. This project, at its peak, employed 5,000 people, tested pathogens on 2,000 live human volunteers, and conducted open-air tests on American soil. The U.S. government appropriated research from Japanese experiments on Chinese civilians, thus benefiting from one of the twentieth century's greatest atrocities; sprayed its own cities with bacterial aerosols; and stockpiled millions of bacterial bombs for instant deployment. Yet, surprisingly, almost nothing has been published about this project until now. In light of America's increasing surveillance and condemnation of foreign biological weapons programs, this exposé of America's own dangerous Cold War secret is both fascinating and shocking.


Holtzbrinck
The first book to expose the true story of America's secret program to create biological weapons of mass destruction.

The first book to expose the true story of America's secret program to create biological weapons of mass destruction.

From anthrax to botulism, from smallpox to Ebola, the threat of biological destruction is rapidly overtaking our collective fear of atomic weaponry. In an era when a lone fanatic could wipe out an entire population with the contents of a small vial, the specter of germ warfare has moved into a prominent position in the public's mind. This riveting narrative traces America's own covert biological weapons program from its origins in World War II to its abrupt cancellation in 1969. This project, at its peak, employed 5,000 people, tested pathogens on 2,000 live human volunteers, and conducted open-air tests on American soil. The U.S. government appropriated research from Japanese experiments on Chinese civilians, thus benefiting from one of the twentieth century's greatest atrocities; sprayed its own cities with bacterial aerosols; and stockpiled millions of bacterial bombs for instant deployment. Yet, surprisingly, almost nothing has been published about this project until now. In light of America's increasing surveillance and condemnation of foreign biological weapons programs, this exposé of America's own dangerous Cold War secret is both fascinating and shocking.


Blackwell North Amer
Few voices have been louder than the American government's in condemning the spread of biological weapons programs around the world. How astonishing, then, to discover that for thirty years the United States conducted its own large-scale covert biological weapons project. Ed Regis tells the story of this project from its origins in World War II to its abrupt cancellation in 1969. At its peak, the program employed 4,036 people, tested pathogens on more than 2,000 live human volunteers, and secretly conducted open-air pathogen tests on American soil. By its end, the project's scientists had weaponized three lethal biological agents and toxins and four incapacitating agents, covertly sprayed its own cities with bacterial aerosols, and had stockpiled more than two million biological bombs ready for deployment on the battlefield. Yet, suprisingly, almost nothing has been published about the program before now.
Based on 2,000 pages of declassified documents, and personal interviews with many of the original project's top scientists, this expose of America's last Cold War secret is both fascinating and shocking.

Baker
& Taylor

The author of Who Got Einstein's Office offers a provocative expose+a7 of America's secret biological warfare program, from its origins during World War II to its end in 1969.

Publisher: New York : Henry Holt, 1999
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780805057645
0805057641
Branch Call Number: 358.38 REG
Characteristics: 259 p. ; 24 cm

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