Neither Wolf Nor Dog

Neither Wolf Nor Dog

On Forgotten Roads With An Indian Elder

Book - 1994
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Baker & Taylor
Exploring the wisdom and spiritual insight of the Native American experience, the author delves into the world of an old man on a plains reservation, recording his eloquent reflections on the history of his people. Original. 25,000 first printing. IP.

Blackwell North Amer
Against an unflinching backdrop of contemporary reservation life and the majestic spaces of the western Dakotas, Neither Wolf nor Dog tells the story of two men, one white and one Indian, locked in their own understandings yet struggling to find a common voice. In this winner of the 1996 Minnesota Book Award, acclaimed author Kent Nerburn draws us deep into the world of a Native American elder named Dan, who leads Kent through Indian towns and down forgotten roads that swirl with the memories of the Ghost Dance and Sitting Bull. Along the way we meet a vivid cast of characters - ranging from Jumbo, a 400-pound mechanic, to Annie, an eighty-year-old Lakota woman living in a log cabin with no running water.

Baker
& Taylor

Relates the story of the hardships and truths faced by Dan, a 78-year-old Lakota man

Publisher: San Rafael, CA : New World Library, Publishers Group West (distr.), c1994
ISBN: 9781880032374
1880032376
Branch Call Number: 970.0049 NER
Characteristics: 291 p. ; 22 cm
Additional Contributors: Dan 1915-

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JCLHelenH Aug 24, 2017

Nerburn does a wonderful job of lending perspective to issues such as sports mascots, land ownership, and possessions. This book gave me a lot to think about, not only about Native American culture, but my own as well.

d
dalynch1966
Nov 12, 2016

An excellent read which enables the reader to appreciate the background and reasoning of Native Americans. Students and adults have much to learn from this book.

r
ryner
Dec 31, 2015

When author Kent Nerburn received a phone call from an unknown woman, notifying him that her father, an elderly Native American, wanted to speak with him, Nerburn felt both apprehensive and curious, but nevertheless packed up his car and went. Dan, it turned out, wished for Nerburn to write a book -- not about his own life, necessarily, but about his thoughts, ideas and advice to the world. To Nerburn's surprise, gathering and recording Dan's words would take the form of an impromptu road trip in an ancient Buick over both unmarked roads and terrain that could only be called a road by a stretch of the imagination.
NWND had been on my to-read list for years, and when I saw my library had a crisp, brand new copy I jumped at the chance to be the first patron to lay my hands on it. It is a deserving recipient of the 1996 Minnesota Book Award, and I had a difficult time putting it down. Although Dan was adamant that the book not be about his life or just the words of another "wise, old Indian," the reader is nevertheless afforded sneaking glimpses into his past. Dan provides insight on the ways Native American philosophies are alive and well today in unexpected ways, though generally overlooked and invisible to white observers. Naturally, upon finishing I also wondered who Dan really was, and what became of him following the book's publication, but there doesn't seem to be any information readily available, perhaps by design.

8
8waya8
Apr 03, 2014

Kent Nerburn is a writer, a sculptor and an educator. His book, Neither Wolf Nor Dog, epitomizes education. The book had to be written and Kent was chosen to be its author. All North Americans should read it. It will initiate a healing process. Healing is a prerequisite to the continued growth and development of North America. The book is not easy or enjoyable reading. Not because of the concepts or vocabulary. But because of the sad truth. It is the voice of the survivors of a genocide. It is the voice of native North America. It asks only to be heard. A humble request, but it is a painful story. The narrator is an old American Indian. The old man is not lamenting. There is a higher purpose. It includes everyone. I have cherokee blood. It is mixed with Welsh, Irish, German and Swedish. I was not raised in the native culture. However, I am a perpetual student of this aspect of my heritage. I found Kent's book at a crucial time, and I am very thankful. It helped me to see that I have been disrespectful to the native people of this land, because of my ignorance. I believe that our planet can continue to exist in a natural way; only if modern man accepts the teaching of the dwindling aboriginal population. For this purpose, the true story of the Indian must be heard. Not for the sake of pity or guilt, but to prepare a basis for spiritual healing. A healing that begins when people learn the truth. The truth of the native North Americans. After the healing, aboriginal people can share their wisdom with the rest of the planet. They can teach people how to respect the planet, before it is entombed in concrete and steel. They can teach us to acknowledge the red man. They can teach us to abandon the myth of the noble savage. They can teach us to be proud of our heritage. Every centimeter of North America is a witness to the truth and has an ancient name. It is time to learn. Neither Wolf Nor Dog is a test. Open your heart. Teach your children.

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