Displaced Persons

Displaced Persons

Growing up American After the Holocaust

Book - 2001
Average Rating:
Rate this:
Baker & Taylor
The New York Times reporter vividly recreates his parents' journey to the U.S. as Jewish-Polish immigrants fleeing the war and their subsequent struggle to survive in New York during the 1950s and 1960s. 20,000 first printing.

Blackwell North Amer
"Although I may not have been able to articulate it, I already felt these alien streets would be a trial, filled with unfamiliar faces and unfamiliar tongues. How could I make a friend when I didn't even speak English? How could I understand a teacher or classmate? And how could I rely on my perplexed, frightened parents to help me cope?"
So begins New York Times reporter Joseph Berger's beguiling account of how one family of Polish Jews - with one son born at the close of World War II and the other one in a "displaced persons" camp outside Berlin - managed to make a life for themselves in an utterly foreign landscape. Displaced Persons speaks directly to a little-known slice of Holocaust history, illuminating as never before the experience of 140,000 refugees who came to the United States between 1947 and 1953.
The world of Manhattan's Upper West Side, in the shadow of Hitler's atrocities, has been the subject of some of Isaac Bashevis Singer's best fiction. But through the eyes of a bright and perceptive boy we come to understand the reality on a more visceral level. Like many immigrants and children of immigrants, Jospeh Berger lives in two worlds at the same time. On the one hand, there is this thrillingly rich American turf to explore as a child, and he does a brilliant job of bringing that adventure to life. On the other hand, he never lets us forget what it's like to feel intractably rooted in another, incompatible world of refugee parents who cannot speak English, a world of people dazed from unimaginable loss, and whose loneliness is unrelenting.

Baker
& Taylor

The New York Times reporter gives an account of his family, Polish Jews, who joined other Holocaust refugees to come to the United States, and made a life for themselves depite their foreign surroundings and horrific past.

Simon and Schuster
"Although I may not have been able to articulate it, I already felt these alien streets would be a trial, filled with unfamiliar faces and unfamiliar tongues. How could I make a friend when I didn't even speak English? How could I understand a teacher or classmate? And how could I rely on my perplexed, frightened parents to help me cope?" So begins veteran New York Times reporter Joseph Berger's beguiling account of how one family of Polish Jews -- with one son born at the close of World War II and the other in a "displaced persons" camp outside Berlin -- managed to make a life for themselves in an utterly foreign landscape. Displaced Persons speaks directly to a little-known slice of Holocaust history, illuminating as never before the experience of 140,000 refugees who came to the United States between 1947 and 1953. The world of Manhattan's Upper West Side, in the shadow of Hitler's atrocities, has been the subject of some of Isaac Bashevis Singer's best fiction. But through the eyes of a bright and perceptive boy we come to understand the reality on a more visceral level. Like many immigrants and children of immigrants, Joseph Berger lives in two worlds at the same time. On the one hand, there is this thrillingly rich American turf to explore as a child, and he does a brilliant job of bringing that adventure to life. On the otherhand, he never lets us forget what it's like to feel intractably rooted in another, incompatible world of refugee parents who cannot speak English, a world of people dazed from unimaginable loss, and whose loneliness is unrelenting. Joseph Berger pays eloquent homage to his parents' extraordinary courage, luck, and hard work. For as he says, "If we, the sons and daughters of those who survived, will not remember their vanished world, who will?" But Displaced Persons also testifies to the frustratingly hardy state of being a refugee -- no matter where one's initial port of call happens to be and no matter how much success has been achieved in the adopted country. By writing so sweetly and honestly about this "indelible way of seeing the world," Joseph Berger has shed a warm light on a perennial, universal condition.

Publisher: New York : Scribner, c2001
ISBN: 9780684857572
068485757X
Branch Call Number: B BER
Characteristics: 347 p. : ill. ; 25 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at DPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top