Lincoln's Greatest Speech

Lincoln's Greatest Speech

The Second Inaugural

Book - 2002
Average Rating:
Rate this:
Baker & Taylor
Details Lincoln's second inaugural address, drawn from his rhetorical genius and a lifetime of moral contemplation, transforming the meaning of the Civil War and offering the moral framework for peace and unity nationwide.

Baker
& Taylor

A fascinating and relevatory volume details Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, drawn from his rhetorical genius, biblical learning, and a lifetime of moral contemplation, transforming the meaning of the Civil War and offering the moral framework for peace and unity nationwide. 35,000 first printing.

Simon and Schuster
After four years of unspeakable horror and sacrifice on both sides, the Civil War was about to end. On March 4, 1865, at his Second Inaugural, President Lincoln did not offer the North the victory speech it yearned for, nor did he blame the South solely for the sin of slavery. Calling the whole nation to account, Lincoln offered a moral framework for peace and reconciliation. The speech was greeted with indifference, misunderstanding, and hostility by many in the Union. But it was a great work, the victorious culmination of Lincoln's own lifelong struggle with the issue of slavery, and he well understood it to be his most profound speech. Eventually this "with malice toward none" address would be accepted and revered as one of the greatest in the nation's history. In 703 words, delivered slowly, Lincoln transformed the meaning of the suffering brought about by the Civil War. He offered reunification, not revenge. Among those present were black soldiers and confederate deserters, ordinary citizens from all over, the black leader Frederick Douglass, the Cabinet, and other notables. John Wilkes Booth is visible in the crowd behind the president as he addresses posterity. Ronald C. White's compelling description of Lincoln's articulation of the nation's struggle and of the suffering of all -- North, South, soldier, slave -- offers new insight into Lincoln's own hard-won victory over doubt, and his promise of redemption and hope. White demonstrates with authority and passion how these words, delivered only weeks before his assassination, were the culmination of Lincoln's moral and rhetorical genius.

Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, c2002
ISBN: 9780743212984
0743212983
Branch Call Number: 973.7 WHI
Characteristics: 254 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at DPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top