The Incantation of Frida K

The Incantation of Frida K

Book - 2002
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Random House, Inc.
"I was born in rain and I will die in rain," begins Kate Braverman’s The Incantation of Frida K., an imagined life journey of Frida Kahlo. The book opens and closes inside the mind of Frida K., at 46, on her deathbed, taking us through a kaleidoscope of memories and hallucinations where we shiver for two hundred pages on the threshold of life and death, dream and reality, truth and myth. Defiant and uncompromising, Frida bears the wounds of her body and spirit with a stark pride, transcending all limitations, wrapping her senses around the places, events, and conversations in her past. Frida K. interacts from her hospital bed with her mother, sister, Diego, and her nurse. She calls herself a "water woman," navigating into unexplored dimensions of her world, leading us through the alleys of San Francisco’s Chinatown, of Paris in 1939 (where she rubbed shoulders with André Breton), and of her neighborhood in Mexico City, Coyoacan. Her voyage is an inward one, an incantation before dying. In The Incantation of Frida K., Braverman’s language dances and spins. She carves out a bold interpretation of the life of an artist to whom she is vitally connected.

Baker & Taylor
On her deathbed at age forty-six, artist Frida Kahlo recounts through memory and hallucination her life experiences, including her interactions with fellow artist Diego Rivera, who she loves despite her open scorn of his creations.

Blackwell North Amer
"I was born in rain and I will die in rain," begins Kate Braverman's The Incantation of Frida K., an imagined journey through the life of Frida Kahlo. We are inside the mind of Frida K., at 46, on her deathbed, racked with memories and hallucinations. We shiver on the threshold of life and death, dream and reality, truth and myth.
Frida K. navigates the alleys and opium dens of San Francisco's Chinatown in the '20s, of Paris in the '30s (where she rubs shoulders with and snubs Andre Breton and Pablo Picasso), the Park Avenue salons of Rockefeller's New York, and back to Coyoacan, her corner of Mexico City. Braverman's Frida openly scorns her lover, Diego Rivera, for his "predictable geometry" and conventional vision. Still, they are deeply enmeshed, and he is integral to her psyche. Frida K.'s voyage is an inward one, an incantation before dying. Braverman redefines the natural order. Her language is brutally lyrical, seductive, and utterly original. She carves out a bold interpretation of an artist to whom she is vitally connected. The Incantation of Frida K. is an inhabitation, an autopsy of the soul.

Publisher: New York : Seven Stories Press, c2002
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9781583224694
1583224696
Branch Call Number: F BRA
Characteristics: 235 p. ; 22 cm

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