Watch Out for Clever Women!

Watch Out for Clever Women!

Hispanic Folktales

Book - 1994
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Baker & Taylor
A retelling, in parallel English and Spanish text, of traditional tales from New Mexico about resourceful women

Perseus Publishing
A bilingual collection of Southwestern folktales with some tricky women teaching people simple lessons. Humor shines through the fabric of these fables, with bad guys finding that the joke is, invariably, on them.—Bookpaper

"Our favorite storyteller, Joe Hayes, goes in for a bit of affirmative action in this collection of his Hispanic folktales. Every one of them features a woman heroine, every one of them is presented in Spanish and English, and every one of them is great fun in the best Joe Hayes style."— New Mexico Magazine

Table of Contents
In the Days of King Adobe / En los días del Rey Adobín (Spanish)
That Will Teach You / Ya aprenderás (Spanish)
The Day It Snowed Tortillas / El día que nevó tortillas (Spanish)
Just Say Baaaa / Di nomás baaaa (Spanish)
Watch Out! / ¡Cuidado! (Spanish)

A Note from Joe Hayes
"Hispanic tales in the Southwest are almost all of European origin, coming first from Spain to Mexico hundreds of years ago, and then north as Spanish colonists settled in what we now call Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and California. Readers who are familiar with world folklore will recognize all the tales in this collection. For example, some may know an Ethiopian variant of "That Will Teach You" from Harold Courlander’sFire On the Mountain. Many will relate "The Day It Snowed Tortillas," which has been something of a signature story for me for over a decade, to a well-known Russian folktale. In both of these other versions, however, the resourceful character is a man rather than a woman. That a woman is the clever one in the Hispanic variants reveals something about the attitude toward women and a great deal about the sense of humor. People the world over tell stories of a humble individual tricking an overbearing person of higher status, but the idea is especially cherished in Hispanic story lore. Making the trickster a woman, who would traditionally be thought of as less powerful than a man, adds spice to the trick.

From The Day It Snowed Tortillas / El dí que nevó tortillas

Here is a story about a woman who was married to a poor woodcutter. The man was good at this work. He could chop down a tree in no ti

Folktales with an affirmative action twist: In each a woman uses her wits to overcome adversity.

A bilingual collection of Southwestern folktales with some tricky women teaching people simple lessons. Humor shines through the fabric of these fables, with bad guys finding that the joke is, invariably, on them.—Bookpaper

"Our favorite storyteller, Joe Hayes, goes in for a bit of affirmative action in this collection of his Hispanic folktales. Every one of them features a woman heroine, every one of them is presented in Spanish and English, and every one of them is great fun in the best Joe Hayes style."— New Mexico Magazine

Table of Contents
In the Days of King Adobe / En los días del Rey Adobín (Spanish)
That Will Teach You / Ya aprenderás (Spanish)
The Day It Snowed Tortillas / El día que nevó tortillas (Spanish)
Just Say Baaaa / Di nomás baaaa (Spanish)
Watch Out! / ¡Cuidado! (Spanish)

A Note from Joe Hayes
"Hispanic tales in the Southwest are almost all of European origin, coming first from Spain to Mexico hundreds of years ago, and then north as Spanish colonists settled in what we now call Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and California. Readers who are familiar with world folklore will recognize all the tales in this collection. For example, some may know an Ethiopian variant of "That Will Teach You" from Harold Courlander’s Fire On the Mountain. Many will relate "The Day It Snowed Tortillas," which has been something of a signature story for me for over a decade, to a well-known Russian folktale. In both of these other versions, however, the resourceful character is a man rather than a woman. That a woman is the clever one in the Hispanic variants reveals something about the attitude toward women and a great deal about the sense of humor. People the world over tell stories of a humble individual tricking an overbearing person of higher status, but the idea is especially cherished in Hispanic story lore. Making the trickster a woman, who would traditionally be thought of as less powerful than a man, adds spice to the trick.

From The Day It Snowed Tortillas / El dí que nevó tortillas

Here is a story about a woman who was married to a poor woodcutter. The man was good at this work. He could chop down a tree in no ti


Publisher: El Paso, TX : Cinco Puntos Press, c1994
Series:
ISBN: 9780938317203
0938317202
9780938317210
0938317210
Branch Call Number: SPANISH YS 398.2 HAY
Characteristics: 77p. : ill. ; 27cm
Additional Contributors: Hill, Vicki Trego - Illustrator

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