Capital Losses

Capital Losses

A Cultural History of Washington's Destroyed Buildings

Book - 2003
Rate this:
Random House, Inc.
Before the passage of critical preservation legislation in 1978, the Nation's Capital lost an irreplaceable assembly of architecturally and culturally significant buildings. Wanton destruction in the name of progress—particularly in the decades immediately following World War II—resulted in a legacy forever lost, a cultural heritage destroyed by the wrecker's ball. By reminding us of things lost, James Goode's magisterial and poignant study represented a comprehensive call for action, a mandate for responsible stewardship of the architectural legacy of Washington, DC. Both the familiar public Washington of official landmarks and the private city of residential neighborhoods are paid tribute in this volume, dedicated to the vanished.

At once a visual delight, a fascinating social history, and an eloquent appeal for ongoing awareness, Capital Losses reveals the Washington that was and how it became what it is today. This updated edition includes eighteen more treasures lost and ninety additional historic photographs.

Blackwell North Amer
Before the passage of critical preservation legislation in 1978, the Nation's Capital lost an irreplaceable assembly of architecturally and culturally significant buildings. Wanton destruction in the name of progress - particularly in the decades immediately following World War II - resulted in a legacy forever lost, a cultural heritage destroyed by the wrecker's ball.
In originally documenting 252 of these historic losses, the publication of Capital Losses a quarter century ago created a clarion call for preservationists. By reminding us of things lost, James Goode's magisterial and poignant study represented a comprehensive call for action, a mandate for responsible stewardship of the architectural legacy of Washington, D.C. In the decades since, rising public awareness and the passage of the Historic District and Historic Landmark Protection Act in 1978 have slowed the pace of thoughtless destruction. But as this completely new and updated edition of Capital Losses demonstrates, vigilance remains the watchword, especially as pressures for urban growth continue to intensify.
Capital Losses reveals the Washington that was and how it became what it is today. This updated edition includes eighteen more treasures lost - among them Rhodes Tavern and Valley View - and ninety additional historic photographs. The 270 buildings featured here range from the earliest Georgian plantation house to the latest art deco commercial structure and include private houses, hotels, apartment houses, office and government buildings, schools, hospitals, churches, and fire stations.
Both the familiar public Washington of official landmarks and the private city of residential neighborhoods are paid tribute in this volume, dedicated to the vanished. A foreword by noted architectural historian Richard Longstreth brings the preservation story up to the present.

Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Books, c2003
Edition: 2nd ed
ISBN: 9781588341051
1588341054
Branch Call Number: 975.3 GOO
Characteristics: xxxiii, 539 p. : ill. ; 31 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at DPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top