Spiritually Incorrect

Spiritually Incorrect

Finding God in All the Wrong Places

Book - 2004
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Baker & Taylor
Humorous stories from the award-winning author's own spiritually incorrect journey to God punctuate his ultimate revelation that spirituality is not about conforming to a set of rules, but rather discovering the practices that uniquely work for you. Original.

Ingram Publishing Services
Breaks down the barriers that lie in the way of spiritual fulfillment, showing you that rules were made to be broken, and how it’s possible—and imperative—for you to discover a rewarding spiritual life that fits your own personality, your own path.

Spirituality is full of rules. You need to find your own way straight through them.
Will tattoos and convertibles keep you from finding "true" spiritual fulfillment?

Some people claim that you cannot truly achieve spiritual fulfillment if you’re not a vegetarian. Some say you’ll never find the path if you don’t learn yoga. And some would insist that any display of vanity—cosmetic surgery! hair mousse!—is a sign that inner peace is way out of your reach.

With great candor and humor (much of it irreverent!), Dan Wakefield’s Spiritually Incorrect shows that there are as many ways to find spiritual fulfillment as there are individual seekers. Part memoir, part essay, part whimsical illustration from his own life, Wakefield’s reflections break down the barriers that lie in the way of spiritual fulfillment, showing you that rules were made to be broken, and how it’s possible—and imperative—for you to discover a rewarding spiritual life that fits your own personality, your own path.

In this age of political correctness and watching what we say, award-winning author Dan Wakefield dares to ask the risky (and sometimes hilarious) questions about spirituality:

  • Why is poverty sacred, wealth profane?
  • Can a coffee house be a sacred space?
  • Does yoga make you a Hindu?
  • Can a man pray in public and still be "macho"?
  • Does eating a steak really taint your soul?
  • Who in our lives and our modern day world deserves to be canonized as a saint?

Wakefield’s creative exploration of these questions is a quest to free the spiritual world from pretension, anxiety, and the seemingly endless rules that can dictate how you identify (or don’t) with religion. Humorous stories from his own spiritually incorrect journey to God punctuate Wakefield’s ultimate revelation that spirituality is not about conforming to a set of rules, but rather discovering the practices that uniquely work for you.



Publisher: Woodstock, Vt. : SkyLight Paths Pub., c2004
ISBN: 9781893361881
1893361888
Branch Call Number: 248.4 WAK
Characteristics: x, 167 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Additional Contributors: DelVecchio, Marian

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jackseney Oct 24, 2015

This begins as the story of how former TV writer Wakefield recovered from depression and alcohol addiction via liberal Christianity and "New Age" religion-shopping. As such it is a readable and entertaining account of one man's enlightenment - his turning back to a questing spirituality and away from materialism. Then come some problems. At one point, Wakefield completely misstates Catholic precepts as he professes "shock" that Church officials have dared to re-assert the solid truth of Catholic teaching. But rather than look into the heart of the matter and the reasons for Catholic belief himself, he takes the word of an admittedly anti-Catholic pal and a liberal Boston Globe writer who (mis)quotes from another source. By doing so, Wakefield seems to forget HIS OWN TESTIMONY that the most tolerant spirituality he's ever seen came from a Catholic monk, and from the writer-priest Henri Nouwen. The rest of the book displays an unsurprising bias for spiritual things that are "open" and "inclusive" and against those deemed "fundamentalist" and "dogmatic." And this from a Wakefield who says he dislikes labels and categories. It doesn't seem to occur to him that there would probably not be any spiritual liberalism had it not been for traditionalism's preservation of basic foundations. But in liberalism's OWN dogma, it seems that orthodox belief is no longer allowed a place. Still, Wakefield's explorations seem good-hearted and are well-written and interesting. If only it had been more ... well, SPIRITUALLY INCORRECT, by giving traditionalism a fair hearing.

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