The Making of the Poets

The Making of the Poets

Byron and Shelley in Their Time

Book - 2003
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Baker & Taylor
A dual biography of the two acclaimed poets who came to epitomize the Romantic Era examines the early lives of these two rebellious writers, born into a world of political and intellectual turmoil, who pursued freedom from traditional authority in their politics, poetry, and love, examining their early literary accomplishments, revolutionary ideals, travels, and love affairs.

Perseus Publishing
Leaving no stone unturned in this illuminating portrait of Byron and Shelley’s formative years, Ian Gilmour’s entertaining dual biography explores the early lives of these two rebellious poets as they pursued freedom from traditional authority—in poetry, in politics, and in love. Born at a time of political and intellectual upheaval, the two well-born heretics were at ideological odds with the establishment even as boys. During their brief stints at university—Shelley was expelled from Oxford after publishing The Necessity of Atheism, and at Cambridge Byron concentrated mostly on gambling and whoring—they developed a fervent mutual hatred of persecution, inequality, and compulsory religion, quite to the shock of their fellow aristocrats. Their embrace of revolutionary ideals manifested itself, too, in their travels abroad, youthful love affairs, and early accomplishments in the literary arena. The twenty-four-year-old Byron became an immediate sensation upon the publication of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (“I awoke one morning and found myself famous”), but the prolific Shelley would not “become [a] star among the stars of mortal night,” as he put it, until after his death. Black-and-white illustrations add to this impressive work, charting the careers of these two revolutionary poets who came to epitomize the Romantic Age.

Leaving no stone unturned in this illuminating portrait of Byron and Shelley's formative years, Ian Gilmour's entertaining dual biography explores the early lives of these two rebellious poets as they pursued freedom from traditional authority—in poetry, in politics, and in love. Born at a time of political and intellectual upheaval, the two well-born heretics were at ideological odds with the establishment even as boys. During their brief stints at university—Shelley was expelled from Oxford after publishing The Necessity of Atheism, and at Cambridge Byron concentrated mostly on gambling and whoring—they developed a fervent mutual hatred of persecution, inequality, and compulsory religion, quite to the shock of their fellow aristocrats. Their embrace of revolutionary ideals manifested itself, too, in their travels abroad, youthful love affairs, and early accomplishments in the literary arena. The twenty-four-year-old Byron became an immediate sensation upon the publication of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage ("I awoke one morning and found myself famous"), but the prolific Shelley would not "become [a] star among the stars of mortal night," as he put it, until after his death. Black-and-white illustrations add to this impressive work, charting the careers of these two revolutionary poets who came to epitomize the Romantic Age.


Blackwell North Amer
Rebellious, passionate, wildly defiant ... of convention and authority, the fiery George Gordon, Lord Byron, and fearless Percy Bysshe Shelley would come to epitomize both in their lives and in their poetry the spirit of the Romantic Age. Yet neither of them was born to be a revolutionary.
In this dual biography, the first ever to focus exclusively on the lives of Byron and Shelley as well-born youths nurtured by their politically and socially turbulent times, Ian Gilmour illuminates the darkest corners of their formative years. At ideological odds with traditional values even as young boys, Byron at Harrow and Shelley at Eton found themselves first stultified by and then resistant to authority in any institutional guise. Nor did their brief stints at university - Shelley was expelled from Oxford after publishing The Necessity of Atheism and at Cambridge Byron concentrated mostly on gambling and whoring - prove to be more congenial to their mutinous souls. Indeed, they left their respective schools with an abhorrence of inequality, compulsory religion, and persecution that shocked their fellow aristocrats.

Publisher: New York : Carroll & Graf Publishers : Distributed by Publishers Group West, 2003
Edition: 1st Carroll & Graf ed
ISBN: 9780786712731
0786712732
Branch Call Number: 920 GIL
Characteristics: xiii, 402 p. : ill. ; 24 cm

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