Defying Dixie

Defying Dixie

The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950

Book - 2008
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WW Norton
The civil rights movement that loomed over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down, from a ludicrous attempt to organize black workers with a stage production of Pushkin—in Russian—to the courageous fight of striking workers against police and corporate violence in Gastonia in 1929. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights. Little-known heroes abound in a book that will recast our understanding of the most important social movement in twentieth-century America.

Baker & Taylor
A history of the effort to promote social justice throughout the American South in the decades prior to the civil rights movement documents the contributions of people from all walks of life, in an account that places key events against a backdrop of national and global events. 10,000 first printing.

Norton Pub
The civil rights movement that loomed over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down, from a ludicrous attempt to organize black workers with a stage production of Pushkin—in Russian—to the courageous fight of striking workers against police and corporate violence in Gastonia in 1929. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights. Little-known heroes abound in a book that will recast our understanding of the most important social movement in twentieth-century America.
A groundbreaking history of the Southern movement for social justice that gave birth to civil rights.

Book News
Gilmore (history, Yale) is a native of South Carolina who specializes in Southern history. In this book she traces the roots of the Civil Rights movement in the South. She begins just after World War I as the communist movement encouraged black Southerners and their allies to fight for legal and social equality. She chronicles both the joy and disappointment felt by many of those who traveled to Russia to experience this equality. Some of the participants, like poet Langston Hughes, are well known. Others, like John Owens, the first African-American sent south to organize unions, deserve to be. Especially fascinating is Pauli Murray, who fought prejudice against race and sexual preference. Blending stories of individuals with the history of the fight for racial equality through the Depression and rise of fascism in America as well as overseas, World War II and the Cold War, Gilmore honors those people of all races who struggled. Her well-written study reminds us that those who fought for civil rights were fighting for human rights, as well. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Co., c2008
Edition: 1st ed
Series:
ISBN: 9780393062441
0393062449
Branch Call Number: 303.48 GIL
Characteristics: xii, 642 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm

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