Tomboy

Tomboy

A Graphic Memoir

Book - 2014
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3
 …
Eschewing female stereotypes throughout her early years and failing to gain acceptance on the boys' baseball team, Liz learns to embrace her own views on gender as she comes of age, in an anecdotal graphic novel memoir.
Publisher: San Francisco, California : Zest Books, [2014]
Copyright Date: ©2014
ISBN: 9781936976553
1936976552
Branch Call Number: TEEN 305.309 PRI
Characteristics: 255 pages : chiefly illustrations ; 21 cm

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j
JakeFuture905
Jul 18, 2018

Tons of understandable awkwardness and simplistic art make an amazing graphic novel/memoir. Great read!

r
reverendmike
Sep 12, 2017

A solid 4 stars (maybe even more). An enjoyable read, despite her childhood/teenage awkwardness, as well as the ridiculous bullying she endured at times. Entertaining, heartfelt, and constructive.

JCLTamiT Jan 24, 2017

A great read about struggling to find yourself and your place in society, and just how hard society can make that on you. I'd recommend this for teens, especially those that don't feel they fit in. But also for anyone that may live or work with teens and tweens as a reminder just how hard that time can be.

ArapahoeBridget Aug 24, 2016

I love Liz Prince's cute sort of simple art style, and this is a really well done memoir. I'd recommend it for people who enjoy Raina Telgemeier, anyone who's looking for something with bullies, and people who might be feeling like outcasts. It's a bit more grown up content-wise than Telgemeier, but has many similar themes.

s
skyekilaen
Aug 01, 2016

My son started growing his hair out when he was five, so we've had no shortage of discussions about gender roles and appearances in our household. At this point, he'd probably have the same reaction to us pressuring him for a haircut that four year old Liz Prince did to the suggestion of a dress: tears and sobbing. Dresses, and most "girly" stuff, just wasn't her thing. Navigating her identity as a non-girly girl is the story she tells in Tomboy. It's an autobiographical graphic novel tracing her life from childhood through high school with a focus on gender identity. What she feels, what society dictates, the clash between them, and how people around her react. It's a well-told tale about growing up, and figuring out relationships and who you are. Prince's cartooning style is clean and works well to tell her story. Highly recommended!

r
ReadingRainBro
Oct 13, 2015

It was great. I think it is normal for teens to feel awkward and asexual, so it is definitely tangible. I like how Liz continued to be herself no matter what. I think more girls should know that it is okay to wear comfortable clothes.The unrealistic standards set by society and the gender binary weigh us all down.

2
2kool4skool
Aug 29, 2015

A pretty good book! Really good for thinking about gender roles. While it isn't exactly PG, I think it is an important enough book that kids should read this with a bit of guidance. I would have given this five stars, but I took a star off because 1. It would have been nice to mention transgender people, even though this isn't a transgender story, so kids didn't have to walk away thinking that transitioning was not a thing if they really truly didn't identify with their birth assigned gender, and 2. one of the characters uses "psychotic" as an insult, which I think further pushes the misconception that psychotic people are inherently evil or dangerous.
If you push that aside though, the book has quite a lot of redeeming qualities, but I do think the points I made should be kept in mind.

a
amoby
Aug 20, 2015

Liz Prince as seen in Razorcake magazine.

LydiatheLibrarian Jul 27, 2015

Prince's refusal to conform to what society says a girl should "be" and "do" is inspiring. Though she was often teased for how she looked and what she liked to do, she still stayed true to herself. A great book for discussion about gender roles and self-acceptance.

Mark_Daly Mar 30, 2015

An outstanding meditation on the frustrations of gender roles -- and, by extension, all the other invisible boxes that socety shoves us into. Prince's insistence that she be treated simply as who she is proves quietly inspirational. Much frank talk about adolescence; for older teens.

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Age

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j
JakeFuture905
Jul 18, 2018

JakeFuture905 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

jraxlly Jul 15, 2018

jraxlly thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

b
blue_dolphin_6670
Nov 29, 2017

blue_dolphin_6670 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 12

l
lisafrom75
Nov 21, 2017

lisafrom75 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

green_alligator_9902 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

r
Red_Bird_90
Dec 09, 2015

Red_Bird_90 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Summary

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j
JakeFuture905
Jul 18, 2018

*THIS IS A REVIEW, NOT A SUMMARY*

Tomboy is an autobiographic graphic novel by self-professed tomboy Liz Prince. First published in 2014, Tomboy provides a unique perspective – one of a person who does not wish to conform to gender stereotypes.
The formatting of this book is unorthodox, just like the author. The vast majority of autobiographies are in prose. Indeed, Tomboy defies the stereotypical 100-word, 1-image page for memoirs. However, there is still something considered “normal” in literary terms. This is the presentation of events in chronological order, which makes the book less complicated to read. This book can be considered as an info-graphic. A surprising amount of information about the author and her experiences is shoved into 248 black-and-white art-filled pages. The ratio of art to words is perfect for someone who does not like normality.
The perspective of the book is intriguing. Like most comics, the art is from a third-person angle while the dialogue is from a first-person aspect. Add that to the perspective of a tomboy and you have an alluring book in your hands. There is also the problem of a non-Catholic in a Catholic school. Liz Prince is honest with the trouble she gets in, especially with the change-out-of-mandatory-dress-code scene after mass. Liz does not hold back in spicing up the book.
Unique descriptions are aplenty in this graphic novel. It is filled with information and facts about Liz’s childhood. The book describes in full detail how Liz is bullied and teased daily by both boys and girls because each think Liz is the other. This is because of Liz’s behavioral traits and clothing/apparel choices. There is also a lot of detail in this graphic novel. The art reveals happenings that could not be mentally pictured with just words as reference. Positive experiences also thrive in this book. Examples are when Liz is allowed to wear whatever she wants (meaning: no dresses), fitting in at Girl Scouts, and discovering Warehouse 21 (a teen art center). Whatever the event, Liz is quick to share in this graphic novel.
All in all, this book is personal and shows perfectly the awkwardness of not fitting in. Liz Prince has done an amazing job to show the difficulties of being a girl who wants to be a boy. I recommend this book for anyone over 13 years old who wants to learn more about life.

l
LailaMLucas
Jun 29, 2016

Ever since she was little, Liz preferred jeans to dresses, action figures to dolls, and sports to dress-up. Adults and other kids told her this made her a tomboy. Seeing the way the mass media marketed to girls and told them how they should look and behave, Liz was fine with not falling into the “girly” category. But the tomboy label wasn’t easy to fit into either. Eschewed by girls who didn’t understand her jeans and baseball caps, and belittled by boys who didn’t want to play with a “girl” (especially in front of other boys), Liz had trouble finding her place. Navigating the rocky shoals of middle school social groups, Liz looked for her place.

LibraryK8 Sep 23, 2014

Ever since she was little, Liz preferred jeans to dresses, action figures to dolls, and sports to dress-up. Adults and other kids told her this made her a tomboy. Seeing the way the mass media marketed to girls and told them how they should look and behave, Liz was fine with not falling into the “girly” category. But the tomboy label wasn’t easy to fit into either. Eschewed by girls who didn’t understand her jeans and baseball caps, and belittled by boys who didn’t want to play with a “girl” (especially in front of other boys), Liz had trouble finding her place. Navigating the rocky shoals of middle school social groups, Liz looked for her place.

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l
LailaMLucas
Jun 29, 2016

wow

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